News IdeaPad

This is part of a weekly series featuring content from the Lenovo Companion App We want to ensure you have everything at your fingertips to monitor your new PC. Hopefully you won't run into any problems with your new Lenovo system, but if you do, continue reading to find out where to go to diagnose the problem and find our recommended solutions. Lenovo Diagnostics Lenovo Diagnostics contains a suite of quick and extended tests that include memory, storage (SSD, SATA and SAS), optical, wireless, mother board, CPU, video and RAID. The diagnostics are available as a bootable, or a downloadable package that can be run under Windows (or Linux) operating systems. Monitor System Health If you want to check and monitor your system health then check out the Lenovo Solution Center (LSC). LSC acts as a central hub for monitoring system health and security. With LSC, you can monitor your system’s virus and firewall status, update your software, perform a backup, check battery health, and get registration and warranty information. You can also immediately test or schedule a test of your system’s hardware, and learn from hints and tips to achieve maximum system performance. LSC uses a snapshot feature, which allows you to compare your current hardware and software configuration with the earlier configuration that was created the first time you launched Lenovo Solution Center. Download LSC for Windows 8.1 

Continue reading “How to Monitor Your New PC and Find Common Support Solutions”

This is part of a weekly series featuring content from the Lenovo Companion App (this post originally appeared on Lenovo Support) For our advanced, tech-savvy users out there, we know you may want to enter Setup Utility or the Boot Menu in Windows 8.1. Here’s how to do it. By default, a Windows 8/8.1 shutdown is not a real shutdown. Instead, it is hybrid shutdown where contents of memory are saved to disk. This allows for a faster startup. However, turning on the PC after a hybrid shutdown does not allow for pressing F1 or F12 during startup. There are several ways to enter Setup Utility (F1) or the Boot Menu (F12) on a Microsoft Windows 8/8.1 PC as explained below: Press and hold the Shift key while selecting the Shutdown option in Windows 8. This will make the PC perform a full shutdown instead of a hybrid shutdown. Then F1 or F12 can be pressed successfully during startup. Select Restart instead of Shutdown. Then F1 or F12 can be pressed successfully during startup. Disable the fast startup option in Control Panel -> Hardware and Sound -> Power Options -> Choose what the power buttons do. It is also possible to access these features from within Windows 8/8.1. To enter Setup Utility: Open the Charms Bar by pressing Windows Key-C or by swiping in from the right edge of your screen Click on Settings Click on Change PC Settings Click on General Scroll to the...

Continue reading “How to Enter the BIOS Setup Utility or Boot Menu with Windows 8.1 | Support Tips”

This is part of a weekly series featuring content written by the Lenovo Companion App Content Team Remember the days of car adapters and power outlets? How quaint. Today’s USB (universal serial bus) connectors let you charge and connect everything from smartphones to quirky gadgets to your PC or tablet. These ports have become so universal they’re often passed out like candy at conferences. And now there’s the reversible USB Type-C connector. Forbes has named it “the most important technology to hit the tech space in years.” The tech-savvy are dubbing it “one cable to connect them all.” So, what exactly is this exciting new technology and why should you care about it? To understand why a small device will be such a big deal, you’ll first need a brief lesson on the history of USBs. First, there are the types: USB Type-A is the original standard with a flat, rectangular shape that most commonly plugs into desktops. USB Type-B is a smaller square form used mostly for connecting large devices like printers to PCs. There are also Mini USBs (used with older devices) and Micro USBs (currently the near-universal standard for smart phones and tablets.) Most consumers have become accustomed to cords that have one USB type on one end (to plug into a desktop, for...

Continue reading “Everything You Need to Know about the New Reversible USB Type-C | Emerging Tech”

This is part of a weekly series featuring content written by the Lenovo Companion App Content Team Getting a new computer is an exciting undertaking. The possibilities of faster computing speed, more space and more organized files await you, as soon as you boot up for the first time. As does the prospect of moving all your old files to your new PC. If you’re not sure where to start, following is an overview of the steps you should take when moving data from one PC to another – and some of the options available for transferring those files. 1. Archive and put your older files in storage The first question you should ask yourself before you transfer is whether you really need all your old files on your new PC. After you’ve done a thorough job of deleting the files you no longer need, you should definitely archive important files older than three years (or sooner, if needed). Depending on the size of your files, you can save them onto discs, USB storage, an external hard drive or online/cloud-based storage. To archive the most files possible, consider compressing your files using applications such as Zip or Stuffit. Once your older files are deleted and archived, you can more easily organize your remaining files and folder structures, so that your new PC will be easier to navigate. 2. Backup before you transfer When it comes to your personal files, it’s always better to be safe than sorry. Although most migrations go off without a...

Continue reading “5 Tips to Transfer Data from Your Old PC to a New One”

A close-up of the all new 360® hinge design

A close-up of the all new 360® hinge design

Guest blog by Tin-Lup Wong, Distinguished Engineer and Executive Director, Strategic Technology and Innovation Center (STIC), PC Product Group. Today, we announced the new YOGA 3 Pro, taking another step in advancing the 360® hinge design we pioneered in 2012 with the original YOGA convertible PC. The new six watchband hinge helps make the laptop 17 percent thinner and 14 percent lighter than its predecessor and also lets you lay it completely flat at 180 degrees.   Making a strong and durable – yet extremely flexible – hinge is something we know well. In previous YOGA models, we designed a dual-hinge system made of zinc alloy. So, you might wonder, why make a new hinge? YOGA users and consumers told us they prioritize thin and light features, so we challenged ourselves to continue to shave millimeters off the design – and to do that, we created the new watchband hinge. Constructed from steel and aluminum, the new hinge provides the same degree of flexibility and flatness of a metallic watchband due to its six flexion points. For the full specs, you can read the press release here, and see the full functionality in action in this video. The Hinge Lift...

Continue reading “The Tough New Yoga Hinge (And What We Did To It)”