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Some application and workloads lend themselves particularly well to scale-up rather than scale-out deployments. Factors contributing to a decision to scale up rather than scale out include processing and memory requirements, the number of end users, scalability cost and administrative cost. Scaling up allows you to add CPU, Memory, I/O and Storage to your servers, and it does not require you re-write your application to harness the new horsepower. For large databases, scale-up architectures can provide higher levels of scalability than large numbers of scale-out distributed databases, and scale-up servers are often easier and less expensive to manage. Lets take a look at some Enterprise applications that are better suited for 4 and 8 socket scale-up deployments: Oracle Database. While Oracle Database software products support both scale-out and scale-up computing, deploying Oracle Databases on scale-up servers brings a number of benefits, including simplified server management, reduced server licensing costs, and reduced operating costs related to IT staff time and management. When scaling-up, Oracle Real Application Cluster (RAC) is not required. Another benefit is that machine resources (especially CPU) are instantly available for sharing. The x3850 and x3950 X6 systems are both certified for both Oracle Linux and Oracle VM:

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Going through my basement the other day (affectionately referred to as my ”Technology Museum”), I came across the cell phone I used ten years ago — right next to my Polaroid Land camera. The cell phone could store up to 99 contacts (because who would need more than that?), had an antenna that pulled up and down (wasn’t it up for long distance, and down for local? — at least that’s what I told everyone), and taking a picture would have been impossible. Technology sure has come a long way in ten years. Microsoft Windows Server 2003 was released about the time I was using that phone. Microsoft is now ending support for the OS on July 15, 2015. Some of you may still be using that platform to run your business. If so, chances are your hardware may be aging as well. Here are a few reasons you may want to move to Windows Server 2012 R2 running on Lenovo ThinkServer systems. Security patches and updates will no longer be available for Windows 2003 and older servers will be more vulnerable to malicious attacks. You could be risking both your business data, including your customer’s personal information and credit card data, as well as your intellectual property. If you lose your business data, your business could be at risk of failing. Ten years ago, businesses were not subject to regulations like Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX), HIPAA and PCI. Violations could result in huge fines — or worse. Applications may not be...

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It’s an exciting time in the enterprise IT market with many in-progress disruptive changes both in technology and business models. The industry remains focused on solutions consisting of hardware based on industry standards and open-source software. A significant emphasis continues to be virtualization, separating hardware requirements from software workload needs and providing new flexibility. Techniques include server virtualization, network virtualization, software-defined storage and software-defined networking. Cloud models for computing are also taking their place as an important part of the enterprise IT landscape. Open Server Summit is the only conference focused entirely on servers and these changes. This year, the Summit will host full-day seminars on software-defined storage (SDS), scale-out servers and silicon photonics. The main conference will have three major tracks: compute/microservers, networking and storage. Sessions cover topics ranging from infrastructure through database and Hadoop acceleration, NFV/SDN-informed networking architecture, microservers, big data and increasing cloud performance. The Lenovo Enterprise Business Group is now helping to lead the charge in comprehending these changes and delivering true value to the IT end-user. We’ve recently integrated the deeply technical and expert System x team together with Lenovo’s scale, supply chain prowess and strong strategic execution. This positions us well to be a...

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System x3750 M4

System x3750 M4

The System x3750 M4 is a 4 socket server featuring a streamlined design, optimized for price/performance, with advanced flexibility and expandability. The x3750 M4 provides maximum storage density, flexible PCIe networking options in a dense 2U form factor. 1) The x3750 M4 is expandable: Most standard models start with 2 processors and two DIMMs, but when you add the processor and memory expansion shelf, you increase the system to 4 processors and 48 DIMM. For storage, you can have 16x 2.5-inch bays or 32x 1.8-inch SSDs. For IO expansion, the x3750 M4 has 8 PCIe slots in addition to a dedicated Mezzanine LOM slot.  2) The x3750 M4 performs exceptionally better than the previous version: The new x3750 M4 server with Intel Xeon E5-46xx v2 processors performs 30-50% better than the previous version.  The processor cores are increased from a max of 8 core to now 12 core per processor.  When moving from the previous version, in most cases, you can drop down a processor level, save cost while also increasing performance,  win-win. 3) Ideal for consolidating 2 socket servers The x3750 M4 performance can be 4 times that of a 2 socket system. Fewer servers and fewer total cores, results in x3750 M4 TCO savings: Lower HW acquisition cost Lower software licensing cost (based on core, processor or servers) Few servers to power, maintain and administrate Less racks taking up valuable floor space 4) The x3750 M4 is a...

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This is part of a weekly series featuring content from the Lenovo Companion App (this post originally appeared on Lenovo Support) We hope you never run into any issues with your new PC, but with that being said, we want to help you troubleshoot and fix any problems that may arise. A USB recovery drive can help you, even if your PC won't start. Your PC might have come with a recovery image that’s used to refresh or reset your PC. The recovery image is stored on a dedicated recovery partition on your PC, and is typically 3-6 GB in size. Windows 8.1 includes a built-in tool to create a USB recovery drive. Windows will let you know how big the recovery partition is, and you'll need a USB flash drive at least that big. Please note that creating a recovery drive will erase anything already stored on your USB flash drive. Use an empty USB flash drive or make sure to transfer any important data from your USB flash drive to another storage device before using it to create a USB recovery drive. To create a USB recovery drive: 1.  Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. If you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search. 2.  Enter “recovery drive” in the search box, and then tap or click “Create a recovery drive”. You might be asked for an admin password or to confirm your choice....

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