Design

Thomas Jefferson was obsessed with inventing unique stands for reading

Thomas Jefferson was obsessed with inventing unique stands for reading

In the world of hardware design, tablets have traditionally been seen as a race for thin. You can’t begin to imagine how many meetings I’ve attended over the last year debating tablet thickness. It must be one of the hottest topics in the entire industry, not just Lenovo. Every effort goes into squeezing the air out of tablets in order to gain a scant fraction of a millimeter advantage in thickness. Beyond actual thickness, we also seek to taper the design toward the edges to further enhance the impression of thin. Sadly, those pesky connectors and buttons seem to always get in the way of making the sleekest form . Do we really need them? I tend to prefer wireless solutions that provide freedom and simplify my world. The Yoga tablet integrates high and low stand functionality thanks to a unique profile With all the recent publicity surrounding the design of the Lenovo Yoga Tablet , and the integration of a flip out leg for viewing and typing modes, it makes me wonder if this isn’t the wave of the future.  At Lenovo we call these positions high and low angle modes. High is typically used for viewing content such as a movie and low primarily for typing. For the Yoga tablet, these modes were uniquely enabled by the use of a row of cylindrical batteries forming an asymmetrical profile. It could be done without using that form, but it would be...

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Birdseye view of the Bento box inspired design

Birdseye view of the Bento box inspired design

Few people have ever seen the “vintage” design model created by Richard Sapper that served as the inspiration for what would become ThinkPad. The concept was imagined outside of the development community within IBM. It was born within the design group to invigorate IBM design. You should not be surprised to learn that it was a nearly perfect “box” shape with proportions and original measures very similar to a Japanese Bento box. Sapper himself has often drawn that comparison when he references ThinkPad’s origin, and the reference is well known within industry and design circles. I just read an article that once again made that connection. You can read it here. The design is still as striking today as it was in the early 1990s The intentionally “boxy” all-black concept amazingly pre-dates the invention of the TrackPoint and the introduction of color displays. For me, it’s hard to even remember a time before these two innovations occurred. Included in the design is an innovative hinge geometry, which at the time was code named the “half moon.” One look at it and you know why. It still looks cool today. All of this is of interest, but there was more to the design than just a simple black box with a unique hinge. The half moon hinge telegraphs how it opens....

Continue reading “Richard Sapper & The Origins of The ThinkPad Keyboard”

Clocks from the design center help keep things synchronized

Clocks from the design center help keep things synchronized

As many of my followers can tell, of late I’ve been conspicuously absent from the blogosphere. It’s nearly been a year since my last post about the ThinkPad Anniversary and an event we hosted at the MoMA. Some people have even speculated that I had died, gone into exile on a deserted island somewhere in the South Pacific, or mysteriously left Lenovo under cover of darkness. Perhaps Mark Twain said it best with his famous quote, “The rumors of my death have been greatly exaggerated.” The simple reality is that blogging takes significant time, especially if you want to do it right. Lately, I just haven’t had the time required. I’ve been working nearly around the clock on strategic design projects for Lenovo. Over the last year I’ve been to Italy, Germany, Japan, and of course China so many times I’ve lost count. Keeping the design trains running takes a lot of horsepower. Unfortunately, blogging had to take a back seat. I pioneered blogging at Lenovo with its inaugural blog Design Matters. It launched shortly after the landmark acquisition of IBM’s PC business. At first, I was a bit apprehensive about blogging but I quickly discovered that it was a wonderful way to have an interactive dialogue with people and get real-time feedback. It’s also a superb creative outlet for me personally. I like it. Now the time is right...

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Flex 20 is a premium AIO for the home Framed in an attractive 20.5mm thin aluminum shell, the compact Flex 20 fits neatly into virtually any home or office yet surpasses expectations for an everyday AIO with its grand 19.5-inch frameless HD (1600X900) IPS 90° tilt display, 500 GB HD or SSHD storage and up to Intel Core i7 processors. However, Flex 20 really surprises and delights with its special ability to convert from stand to table mode. When flat in table mode, the Aura interface, first pioneered on the Lenovo Horizon Table PC, opens for a multi-game, multi-player experience like no other. In this mode, users can challenge others to play games, including preloaded ones like Ubisoft’s Raiding Company, those available for purchase from the Lenovo App Store powered by Intel App Up and newly created custom Lenovo games including Omnitapps Media Puzzle Pack for making fun video puzzles and Omnitapps Educational Suite with a series of memory and learning games along with other Lenovo games like Fishing Joy, Air Hockey and Roulette. The dual mode Flex 20 provides even more entertainment value with its special physical accessories (sold separately) - joysticks, strikers and e-dice – that allow up to four players to interact directly with the digital games, or players can use the 10-point multitouch screen. The Aura interface functions as a highly collaborative tool for multi-media content enhanced with its Dolby Home Theatre v4 audio. Unlike...

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Meet Flex 14 and Flex 15 These two machines are more than a thin and light laptops, the dual-mode Flex 14.1-inch and 15.6-inch laptops creatively flip 300° for stand mode, a new way to interact with a PC and positions the device closer to the user for more natural, comfortable touch experience. Users can open Lenovo’s custom YouCam program, say “1,2,3 cheese” to snap a webcam photo and then send it to a friend using Flex’s voice commands. Or they can enjoy cinematic quality sound to the latest NetFlix movie with Flex’s Dolby Advanced Audio v2 without a keyboard in the way or even watch high definition content on another screen via Flex’s HDMI-out connection. Beyond Flex’s extra value with its dual mode, flip functionality, its fashionable soft-touch black cover trimmed with silver or Clementine Orange also attracts attention. Equally stunning, the interior contains a clean keyboard design with optional backlighting. Images are vividly rich thanks to Flex’s HD 1366X768 or optional Full HD 1920X1080 displays. With 10-point multitouch, Flex makes using Windows 8 and collaboration easy. With up to nine hours, Flex 14 and 15 are extremely mobile and are primed for productivity with up to Intel 4th generation Core ULT i7 processors, up to Nvidia discrete GT 740M graphics, up to 1 TB of storage and optional SSD or NAND flash on Ultrabook models. Video tour here:  

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