Design

ThinkPad Yoga Dons Black and Business-Ready Features Fom the original bento box inspired design, to the butterfly keboard on the ThinkPad 701 from 1995, to the twist of a screen on the ThinkPad Twist, along with the introduction of the sleek X1, and now the ThinkPad Yoga-- history continues to be made as the ThinkPad knows no limits. The new ThinkPad Yoga borrows the flip and fold, four mode design from the original Lenovo Yoga to create its own space for business customers with its performance, security and productivity features as well as customization options. The 12.5-inch magnesium alloy ThinkPad Yoga offers a stunning visual and intensive multimedia experience starting with choices of a Corning Gorilla Glass HD IPS or a FHD IPS display (optional digitizer and pen available for the FHD display) running Windows 8.1. For a responsive touch experience, use its 10-finger touch screen running Windows 8.1 or its oversized five-button glass trackpad optimized for gestures. Designed for maximum comfort in all modes, the ThinkPad Yoga features a unique lift and lock system created for tablet mode. The system automatically lifts and locks the keys on the machine’s keyboard in place for a streamlined feel. Additionally, ThinkPad Yoga features the legendary ThinkPad keyboard with optional backlit models and models with Near Field Communications (NFC) to easily share data between devices. The ThinkPad Yoga has the key performance technologies...

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ThinkPad Tablet 2

ThinkPad Tablet 2

Following on from our third article, "Developers on ThinkPad Tablet 2: User Experience/Hardware", we once again speak directly with the developers. In this fourth article, we focus on the software development directly affecting the user experience. We interviewed two engineers from the software department: one who worked on device drivers for the legendary 700C digitizer pen model and the 750T, in addition to APS (Active Protection System) development, and another who was temporarily posted to Microsoft, and has experience with BIOS development and development of the original Tablet.   - What are your thoughts now that software development for the Tablet 2 is over? Yomo: Though I say it myself, the fact we completed it feels like a miracle (LOL)... With software development for a regular product, you can usually get things working and carry out tests smoothly about three months into development, but it took a long time to get off the ground with the Tablet 2. It really came down to the wire in the end. Maruichi: Developing new BIOS, OS, and ThinkVantage software from scratch for a product was a new experience for us. In the past we've always had a base to work from for at least one of these, and when a problem arose during development we could rule out this stable base to identify the cause of the problem more easily. However, this time we had to build...

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ThinkPad Tablet 2

ThinkPad Tablet 2

Following on from our second article, "Developers on the ThinkPad Tablet 2 - Mechanical Engineering/Industrial Design", we once again speak directly with the developers. In this third session, we discuss focusing on hardware development for touch panels and digitizer pens that are directly related to the user experience. Here are the interviews with two veteran engineers, one who has experience formulating engineering standards for mobile phones from the users' standpoint, and the other who started his career designing LCD circuits and is currently responsible for tablet LCDs.    - The Tablet 2 got high marks for its beautiful screen and great touch performance. Kawakita: It's really great news for us. We have been researching touch-technology for a long time now and we're utilizing the fruit of our labor. Actually, a clear technique that enables the measurement of the comprehensive performance of things like smoothness of touch and response speed did not exist. So we had to begin with the development of that technique itself. But when we completed the technique to some extent, we had become confident that it would work out fine. However, you can't see things one-sidedly. You have to prove the result by measuring performances with the technique. So we asked for the cooperation of a major information technology...

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$1 Sale Poster

$1 Sale Poster

All products will be on sale for $1 only when we reach #1 in worldwide market share! We are now very close to the top position, and we anticipate that the campaign sale will begin shortly. It seems that we already have 100% of the outer space market, but we would like to celebrate this historic day with customers on Earth, and together look towards the future with A New Hope.       * Delivery available to ISS (International Space Station) only. Thank you for your understanding.

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ThinkPad Tablet 2

ThinkPad Tablet 2

Following on from our first article, "Developers on the Tablet 2 - Project ", we present more interviews with the developers. In this second article we discuss mechanical engineering and industrial design. The crucial packaging aspect of the project was handled by an engineer with experience in mechanical design for portable game consoles, and a veteran lead designer around since the birth of the ThinkPad who worked on the 560, X30, and X1, as well as the original Tablet.   - The Tablet 2 is so thin, light, and stylish. First, can you tell us about the enhancements made to the packaging that came up in the last interview? Hasegawa: Sure. Compared to the original, the Tablet 2 went from... 14.5mm to 9.8mm in thickness, which is almost 5mm or over 30% thinner. It also went from about 759g (with pen) to about 590g (with pen), for weight savings of almost 150g, or 23%. As you can imagine, this kind of evolution is almost unheard of in this industry. Now our only problem is figuring out where to go from here (LOL). The concept for the original Tablet was to create a tablet that maintained ThinkPad quality and also included a digitizer pen, which is extremely difficult from a mechanical engineering standpoint. This concept remained unchanged for the Tablet 2, but by placing emphasis on making a thinner, lighter product, we had to take on a lot of new challenges....

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